Wallace Sandstone: "Building Stones for a Nation"
Wallace and Area Museum
Wallace, Nova Scotia

Quarries of Wallace River

1

The first discovery of Wallace sandstone took place along the Wallace River. The original owner, William Mackenzie sold his land to Isaac and Benjamin Smith in 1810. Smith then sold it to Richard Scott on May 2 1810. Scott was contracted by Governor Wentworth to supply stone for the new Provincial Legislature.The foundation was laid August 12, 1811. Shipment began. After several delays, the new Legislature building took eight years to complete.

2

Wallace River, viewing south, up stream
15 August 2003
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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3

The beauty of the Wallace River. Little sign of the brickyard and sandstone quarries of the past.

4

Wallace River, site of first quarries in 1811.
15 August 2003
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


5

Layers sandstone deposit
7 May 2004
Wallace, Nova Scotia, Canada


6

Millions of years ago sediment from a great river became layered on the river bottom, forming the material for the Wallace sandstone quarries.

7

View of the over burden on the Wallace sandstone deposit
May, 2000
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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8

Drill holes direct blast
1990
Wallace, Nova Scotia, Canada


9

Wallace Freestone. "Freestone" is a term for a stone that can be worked in any direction. Most sedimentary rock is laid down in layers. For most carving or dressing the stone its important to work with the grain. Wallace sandstone, though a very hard stone, can be cut in any direction.

10

Historic Swing Railway Bridge over the Wallace River
15 August 2003
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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11

The famous "Swing Bridge" on the now abandoned "Shortline" between Pictou and Oxford, Nova Scotia. The bridge is next to several quarries, the Scott, Battye and Dewar quarries to name a few. The bridge was made from local sandstone in 1892.
Before the railroad stone was shipped by boat from this site.
If you look carefully under the right end of the bridge in this 1907 post card you will see a quarry derrick.

12

Railway Bridge over the Wallace River
1907
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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13

Boot scraper made at the Battye Quarry
1900
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


14

The Battye Quarry gave these boot scrapers away as advertising.
In 1860 Thomas Battye became owners of the Wallace River quarry employing 100 men. He had two ships to carry away the stone, "Freestone" and "Mary Anne"

15

Hand carved name (Battye) on old boot scraper.
1898
Wallace, Nova Scotia, Canada


16

Advertisement for Brickyard
1903
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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17

Advertisement for Battye bricks, 1903. The brickyard and quarry were on the same property.

18

Mr. Brunton
1887
New York, New York
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19

The Brunton and Adams International Brownstone Company was an American Company that leased the old Wallace River Battye Quarry. They operated from 1887 to 1890. The company shipped stone to New York City to build some of the Brownstone Apartment Buildings.

20

Pete's Devils
1902
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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21

A note written on the inside cover of this book, by Wallace Bridge resident, Mary Davison Kennedy, tells the story of the Brunton and Adams International Brownstone Quarry.

22

Brunton and Adams Quarry Mary Kennedy's History of the Company
1902
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


23

Brunton and Adams Quarry, 1880's letterhead
1880
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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24

Telegram for Brunton and Adams
27 June 1889
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada
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25

Brunton and Adams Quarry invoice
24 May 2004
Wallace Bridge


26

Brunton and Adams Account
1887
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


27

Brunton and Adams International Brownstone Quarry records show job classifications such as Mucker, Drill Runner, Quarryman,Blacksmith and Nipper.
Men worked 10 hour days, six and sometimes seven days a week.
In 1889 labour rates start at one dollar a day. The quarry paid two dollars a day for use of donkeys.

28

Brunton and Adams Account
June, 1887
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


29

Brunton and Adams Account Book
1887
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


30

Cutting shop for the A.S. Dewar Quarry
1934
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


31

The Dewar Quarry cutting shed at Wallace River followed by pictures of its most regarded product the 1935 Federal Building in Amherst, Nova Scotia.

32

Federal Building (former Post Office), was built from Wallace sandstone.
15 June 2004
Amherst, Nova Scotia


33

Sandstone column being polished for the Amherst, Nova Scotia Federal Building.
1935
Wallace River, Nova Scotia, Canada


34

A column section for the Amherst, Nova Scotia, Federal Building.

35

Columns on the front of the Amherst, N.S. Federal Building.
1935
Amherst, Nova Scotia
TEXT ATTACHMENT


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