On Canadian Ground - Stories of Footwear in Early Canada See more of the Virtual Museum of Canada
ExhibitionMemorable Shoes

KAMIKS OF THE INUIT
MOCCASINS OF THE FIRST NATIONS
CHANGING STYLES - THE ROLE OF TRADE & VOYAGEURS
SHOES FOR A NEW LAND
SHOES MADE IN THE AGE OF THE CRAFTSMAN
CANADIAN FOOTWEAR IN THE AGE OF THE MACHINE
MEN'S SHOES
WOMEN'S SHOES
BELL SHOES
CHILDREN'S SHOES
SKATES
INDUSTRIALIZATION - MAKING SHOES WITH MACHINES
THE RETAIL STORE
BULLDOG TOE BUTTON BOOTS
ADVERTISING SHOES
THE PRESENT BEGINS HERE
Susanna Moodie Woolsey Family Portrait, 1809 (William Berczy)
Susanna Moodie Woolsey Family Portrait, 1809 (William Berczy)
Portrait of two boys Miss. H. Frothingham on a porch, 1871 (William Notman)
Portrait of two boys Miss. H. Frothingham on a porch, 1871 (William Notman)
Children's Shoes

In the early years, some parents could not afford any shoes for their children: ‘The children, during bad times had been forced to dispense with these necessary coverings. How often during the winter season I wept over their little chapped feet, literally washing them with my tears.’ Susanna Moodie

While infants wore tiny shoes, similar to what they wear today, older children wore miniature versions of contemporary adult shoes. These reflected the changing footwear styles of the time, as many parents took pride in dressing their children in fashionable shoes.

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Child's boot Infant's lace boots Child's button boots Child's boots Girl's boots Child's lace boots
Child's boot Infant's lace boots Child's button boots Child's boots Girl's boots Child's lace boots
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