Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 11

Subject: English

Lesson Title: Wolastoqey Economy

Lesson Description: Using images of creative works, historical photographs and fine art, examine the changes in the Aboriginal economy following European contact and the subsequent social and political implications.

Time required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: Examine meaning through a close reading of text  Analyze an author’s choice of style and its effects Create original and media works based on a text  gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Currency of Change content

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies: Explore the Currenc Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 11

Subject: English

Lesson Title: Wolastoqey Economy

Lesson Description: Using images of creative works, historical photographs and fine art, examine the changes in the Aboriginal economy following European contact and the subsequent social and political implications.

Time required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:

  • Examine meaning through a close reading of text 
  • Analyze an author’s choice of style and its effects
  • Create original and media works based on a text 
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Currency of Change content

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:

  1. Explore the Currency of Change content and discuss the values, economic diversity, decorative traditions and inventiveness of Wolastoqiyik 
  2. After examining the images and audio in more detail, have students write a short memoir about one of their own experiences with making something and either selling it, using it as a gift, or trading for something. Choose a style appropriate to the topic and make the memoir as vivid as possible by appealing to two or more of the five senses: taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight. 
  3. Record the memoir in an audio format as an oral history, or write it as a film or video script 
  4. As a second assignment, have students examine the images and audio in Currency of Change and explore how the Wolastoqey economy changed and how the objects may have changed in production style after European contact. Using Ronald Paul’s oral accounts as a guide, have students compose a short story that incorporates the following elements: travel, production and sale of diverse goods, the challenges of market forces and the effect of economic changes on a culture.

Suggested Assessment Strategies:
Use standard performance-based assessment tools. Recommended criteria:
• Research /0ral Presentations Rubric
• Persuasive Essay Rubric

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources

Supplementary Resources:
Leavitt, Robert M. Maliseet Micmac: First Nations of the Maritimes. Fredericton: New Ireland Press, 2003.

Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/Koluskap/index.php  
http://www.gnb.ca/0016/Wolastoqiyik/index-e.asp  

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.


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Learning Objectives

Currency of Change Learning Object is designed for students and educators to meet the following objectives:

  • analyse the political challenges and opportunities that may affect Canada’s future: examine issues related to Aboriginal autonomy and self-government
  • analyse the social and cultural challenges and opportunities that may affect Canada’s future: predict the possible impact on the future of Canadian society by analyzing socio-economic trends in such areas as the workplace, standards of living, family, and social programs, predict challenges and opportunities that ethnic and cultural groups may face as Canada evolves
  • analyse how economic decisions are made by individuals, organizations, and governments, based on scarcity and opportunity cost
  • assess the role played by economic institutions and examine their impact on individuals and on private and public organizations
  • evaluate the differences among traditional, command, and market economic systems and explain the development of “mixed” economies
  • evaluate factors that influence the distribution of wealth locally, nationally, and internationally
  • apply knowledge of economic concepts in developing a response to current economic issues such as disparity and sustainability
  • examine others’ ideas and synthesize what is helpful to clarify and expand on their own understanding
  • ask discerning questions to acquire, interpret, analyze, and evaluate ideas and information
  • articulate, advocate, and justify positions on issues or text in a convincing manner, showing an understanding of a range of viewpoints
  • listen critically to analyze and evaluate concepts, ideas, and information
  • adapt language and delivery for a variety of audiences and purposes in informal and formal contexts, some of which are characterized by complexity of purpose, procedure, and subject matter
  • respond to a wide range of complex questions and directions

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