Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 9

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: A Day in the Life

Lesson Description: The student will recognize their daily contribution to the growth and/or destruction of the environment around them. This lifestyle is a great change in the manner in which historically Aboriginals and Canadians have viewed their community resources and environment. Students will see the manner in which we have treated and used our environment over the last 100 years and will see the impact of their daily habits on the environment.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minutes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:  Analyze the effects of selected geographic factors on Wolastoqiyik identity: describe where Wolastoqiyik live and explain why communities are established and grow in particular locations, account for the variations in growth of settlements due to physical and human factors. gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqi Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 9

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: A Day in the Life

Lesson Description: The student will recognize their daily contribution to the growth and/or destruction of the environment around them. This lifestyle is a great change in the manner in which historically Aboriginals and Canadians have viewed their community resources and environment. Students will see the manner in which we have treated and used our environment over the last 100 years and will see the impact of their daily habits on the environment.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minutes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: 

  • Analyze the effects of selected geographic factors on Wolastoqiyik identity: describe where Wolastoqiyik live and explain why communities are established and grow in particular locations, account for the variations in growth of settlements due to physical and human factors.
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions 

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Seasons of Change content, paper, pencil

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:

  1. The students will keep a journal for three days. In this journal they will list everything they eat, make, throw out, and keep-their total consumption-including showers, bathroom visits etc. 
  2. They will come to class with their daily journals. 
  3. They will listen/read Ronald Paul’s account of the various activities in the changing seasons and they will as a class brainstorm a list of activities that he did that involved the environment. 
  4. Ask the students if the “use of the environment” was respectful? 
  5. Ask the student to then review their daily journals. 
  6. Have them identify 5 habits that they have that are “not respectful” to the environment. ***you may wish to begin this activity by sharing something that you do that is not as “respectful.” 
  7. Have the student then come up with environmentally friendly alternatives. 
  8. In groups of 4 or 5 collect all the alternatives and create a poster, decorate a bulletin board or publish them in the school newspaper 
  9. Invite a Wolastoqew Elder to your class to discuss issues and activities related to the Seasons of Change theme. Encourage students to ask questions to discuss and explore the similarities and differences between the experience of the visiting Elder and that of Mr. Paul

Suggested Assessment Strategies:
The students will be able to list at the end of the activity the most destructive habits they perform and will attempt to list alternative behaviours.

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources
Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/Koluskap/index.php

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.


© 2007, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 9

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: Podcasting the Seasons of Change

Lesson Description: Students will use oral histories by Ronald Paul concerning the “seasons” They will listen to Ronald Paul’s histories of seasons and will create graphic organizers to show the difference between Ronald Paul’s stories and their own experiences, with a focus on climate and cultural change. Students will then create their own oral stories of their family/local traditions through the seasons in the same style in the form of podcasts. This lesson plan could be used as part of the Chapter 1 Introduction to Canadian Identity in the Atlantic Social Studies Canadian Identity text (Fitton et al., 2006), or as a class contribution for a Heritage Fair activity described in the Canadian Identity text.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: Investigate how artistic and literary expression refl Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 9

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: Podcasting the Seasons of Change

Lesson Description: Students will use oral histories by Ronald Paul concerning the “seasons” They will listen to Ronald Paul’s histories of seasons and will create graphic organizers to show the difference between Ronald Paul’s stories and their own experiences, with a focus on climate and cultural change. Students will then create their own oral stories of their family/local traditions through the seasons in the same style in the form of podcasts. This lesson plan could be used as part of the Chapter 1 Introduction to Canadian Identity in the Atlantic Social Studies Canadian Identity text (Fitton et al., 2006), or as a class contribution for a Heritage Fair activity described in the Canadian Identity text.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:

  • Investigate how artistic and literary expression reflects the following aspects of Wolastoqiyik identity: landscape, climate, history, people-citizenship, and related challenges and opportunities
  • Analyse the effects of selected geographic factors on Canadian identity
  • describe where Canadians live and explain why communities are established and grow in particular locations 
  • account for the variations in growth of settlements due to physical and human factors 
  • explain the effect of natural and human resources on regional prosperity 
  • confront the issues of regional stereotypes 
  • Students will analyse the factors that contribute to the perception of self and the development of a world view 
  • Students will analyse and explain the ways cultures address human needs and wants 
  • Students will analyse cases and personal values regarding stereotyping, discrimination and conformity and how they affect individuals and groups 
  • Students will evaluate patterns for preserving, modifying and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change. 
  •  Students will assess the effectiveness of interrelationships within and among selected organizations and systems 
  • Students will evaluate issues concerning the diversity and sustainability of Earth’s ecosystems 
  • Students will analyse the interactions within and between regions 
  • Students will evaluate how physical and human systems shape the features, uses and perceptions of place 
  • Students will apply concepts associated with time, continuity and change 
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding that historians are selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use, and that this influences their interpretation of history 
  • Students will interpret and predict patterns of causality and change over time
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Seasons of Change content
Computer lab with access to Apple’s GarageBand program, or Audacity for PC
External microphone for computer recording, or digital voice recorder to record in MP3 format
Server space with RSS feed indexing in order to store the podcasts (suggested format: classroom blog)
External computer speakers

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:
Day 1

  1. Students will begin by brainstorming about the activities in their spare time during the various seasons. They could do this in 4 groups, one for each season, and then presenting the information from each group to the class as a whole 
  2. Students will listen to the stories by Ronald Paul. 
  3. Students will identify differences between their own activities and those Mr. Paul describes. How are these different or similar to the students’ own cultural experiences? Are there differences caused by climatic or environmental change? Students may suggest stories from their own families – stories they may have heard from grandparents, parents, or elderly relatives. At the teacher’s discretion, students may choose to interview people who have first-hand knowledge of past events, such as elderly family members. 
  4. Students will write a draft copy of a story of their own family’s traditions in the changing seasons to form the basis of their podcast.

Day 2

  1. Students will use peer assessment to correct and prepare their finalized stories to be recorded. 
  2. Working with a partner or within a small group, students will record and edit their podcasts, adding transitions and music as desired.

 Day 3

  1. Students will listen to the podcasts created in the class. Students will then revisit the stories of Mr. Paul. What differences do they find? What similarities? How do they account for these similarities or differences? Students can reflect on these differences in a journal entry.

Suggested Assessment Strategies:

Students should be graded informally for their time on task and commitment to the project. Student podcasts should be graded by the teacher on a rubric similar to the following scale:
incomplete; not quite there yet; good effort; excellent work
Content
• Establishes a clear purpose and consistently maintains focus
• Selects quality content
• Arranges presentation using own words
• Always written with the audience in mind
• Title entices the listener.
Delivery
• Extremely well-rehearsed, smooth delivery in a conversational style
• Highly effective enunciation, expression, and rhythm keep the audience hooked
• Consistently uses correct grammar
• Volume of voice enhances presentation
Technical production
• Transitions are smooth, spaced correctly, and without noisy, dead space
• Makes every effort to anticipate and filter out unwanted ambient noise
• Effective use of music
• Sound remains at a consistent level throughout
• Podcast length keeps the audience interested and engaged

Students should also complete a self-assessment.

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources
Supplementary Resources:
Garageband for Apple Computers
External Microphone or digital voice recorder
Fitton, Avis, et al. Canadian Identity. Toronto: Thomson, 2006
Leavitt, Robert M. Maliseet Micmac: First Nations of the Maritimes. Fredericton: New Ireland Press, 1995.

Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/koluskap/index.php

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.

Section Four: Additional Information
Modifications: If the technology to create podcasts is not available for the class, students may present their family traditions in the form of a short play re-enacted by their groupmates.

Additional Comments: While Apple does have the software to make podcasts easy to produce, it is simply a matter of being able to index an RSS feed for the MP3 sound files in order to make the audio files produced by the class into podcasts. Establishing a classroom blog, for instance using WordPress, makes this transition easier. It is also important that parents sign a release allowing the student work to be published on the internet.

This lesson should enhance the students’ understanding, knowledge and valuing of their own heritage and cultural backgrounds, while simultaneously encouraging student responsibility for involvement and participation in the learning process.


© 2007, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 11

Subject: English

Lesson Title: The Interrelationship of Wolastoqiyik and their Environment

Lesson Description: The use of oral histories as examples of how humans interact with eco-systems and use resources during changing seasons.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: Examine a theme from different perspectives.  Analyze patterns of imagery  Relate imagery to the pattern of theme  Explore how artists use different media to create meaning  Examine how different forms, techniques, language and styles affect meaning  Create original media works based on a theme gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 11

Subject: English

Lesson Title: The Interrelationship of Wolastoqiyik and their Environment

Lesson Description: The use of oral histories as examples of how humans interact with eco-systems and use resources during changing seasons.

Time Required: 3 x 60 minute classes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:

  • Examine a theme from different perspectives. 
  • Analyze patterns of imagery 
  • Relate imagery to the pattern of theme 
  • Explore how artists use different media to create meaning 
  • Examine how different forms, techniques, language and styles affect meaning 
  • Create original media works based on a theme
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Seasons of Change content

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:

  1. Give students a definition of what an ecosystem is. According to Webster’s dictionary an ecosystem is “a complex system composed of an ecological community of organisms interacting with the environment.” 
  2. In groups of three or four students have them discuss what is an ecosystem system and what is the major problem affecting the environment today. Also, what can we do to protect the environment? Someone from each group will write down their findings and another person will present it to the class. 
  3. Assign each group one of the Ronald Paul recordings. 
  4. As the groups listen to the recordings they will make notes of how the Mr. Paul refers to activities based on the season and nature: What are the materials used? How are the materials used?, etc. Share transcript after students have created their own notes. 
  5. Share the story Turtle Goes Hunting. Discuss the elements of the story with particular attention to noting items from the Ronald Paul recordings. Also discuss the elements of storytelling and short story development: symbolism, character development, etc.

Assignments

  1. In writing or in an audio recording (podcast), have students describe how life for Wolastoqiyik was influenced by seasons 
  2. In writing or in an audio recording (podcast), have students choose a season and produce a work of fiction concerning an event that might have happened to Wolastoqiyik based on the seasonal conditions.

Suggested Assessment Strategies:

Suggested rubric: 

Introduction:  First paragraph has a "grabber" or catchy beginning; First paragraph has a weak "grabber"; A catchy beginning was attempted but was confusing rather than catchy; No attempt was made to catch the reader's attention in the first paragraph.

Focus on Assigned Topic:  The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic; Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic; Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic; No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic.

Organization:  The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions; The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used; The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear; Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

Creativity: The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination; The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination; The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination; There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources

Supplementary Resources:
Leavitt, Robert M. Maliseet Micmac: First Nations of the Maritimes. Fredericton: New Ireland Press, 2003.

Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/Koluskap/index.php  

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.


© 2007, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 10

Subject: Science

Lesson Title: Seasons of Change:  Sustainability of Ecosystems  

Lesson Description: Using Aboriginal related images along with the story Turtle Goes Hunting, students will be introduced to seasonal variations and how energy flow is altered as a result of it. This leads to discussion on the acquisition of energy throughout the year for various organisms as well as what can be done to ease any burdens that may arise as a result of the changes. Discussion will also include energy allocation, to which organisms should most of the energy go and how this is determined. Throughout the lesson reference to other factors that influence change will be included.

Time Required: 2 x 60 minute classes, more time for research if required

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: Propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account human and environmental needs& Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 10

Subject: Science

Lesson Title: Seasons of Change:  Sustainability of Ecosystems  

Lesson Description: Using Aboriginal related images along with the story Turtle Goes Hunting, students will be introduced to seasonal variations and how energy flow is altered as a result of it. This leads to discussion on the acquisition of energy throughout the year for various organisms as well as what can be done to ease any burdens that may arise as a result of the changes. Discussion will also include energy allocation, to which organisms should most of the energy go and how this is determined. Throughout the lesson reference to other factors that influence change will be included.

Time Required: 2 x 60 minute classes, more time for research if required

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:

  • Propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account human and environmental needs 
  • Explain various ways in which natural populations are kept in equilibrium, and relate this equilibrium to the resource limits of an ecosystem 
  • Explain how biodiversity of an ecosystem contributes to its sustainability 
  • Analyze the impact of external factors on an ecosystem 
  • Plan changes to, predict the effects of, and analyze the impact of external factors on an ecosystem 
  • Select, compile, and display evidence and information from various sources, in different formats, to support a given view in a presentation about ecosystem change 
  • Communicate questions, ideas, and intentions, and receive, interpret, understand, support, and respond to the ideas of others in preparing a report about ecosystem change 
  • Propose and defend a course of action on a multi-perspective social issue
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Seasons of Change content
Overhead or laptop and digital projector (Introduction)
Chalkboard/ Flip chart
Copies of story Turtle Goes Hunting (one / group of two)
Reference books on various organisms OR Computer access

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:

Day 1

  1. Using images and the Turtle Goes Hunting story from the Seasons of Change Learning Object, prepare a short PowerPoint presentation that uses the images as illustrations of the story; alternating story text with images. 
  2. Use the story Turtle Goes Hunting in conjunction with the prepared PowerPoint as a means to introduce gathering food during the colder months. 
  3. In groups of two, have students compose a list of benefits and a list of negatives for winter hunting based on the story. 
  4. Once their lists have been completed, they then will join with another group and compare lists. What points were common and which were different within the new group? These will then be written such that the whole class can view. For similar answers denote it with a number or tally. 
  5. Why did numerous points get repeated? 
  6. How do changes in the environment or number of organisms affect energy acquisition during the winter?

Day 2

  1. Take the list that was generated the day before and now ask the groups of four to compose lists whereby energy is being acquired during the summer. 
  2. Compare how energy acquisition techniques vary with relation to season. 
  3. Have students use the winter/ summer lists as models to generate a similar comparison for an organism which also comes from the Ronald Paul audio and one of the stories on the web site, Koluskap:  Stories from Wolastoqiyik. This can be assigned as a PowerPoint such that research can be done simultaneously, a written report or an oral presentation.

Suggested Assessment Strategies:

Group work:
- Communication skills
- Equality within the group in terms of contribution and acceptance of ideas
- Productivity

Oral report:
- Voice, projection/ clarity
- Informative
- Research skills/ works cited
- Encompasses the necessary material

PowerPoint:
- Contrast
- Interesting
- Informative
- Research/ citations
- Encompasses the necessary material

Written report:
- Informative
- Research skills/ works cited
- Encompasses the necessary material

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources
Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/Koluskap/index.php

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.

Section Four: Additional Information

Modifications:

  • Assessment can be quite variable such that different learners can choose for themselves how they would like to represent their research and ideas. 
  • Assessment may also just be the presentation of the groups ideas to the class with individuals taking on different roles, recorder, main presenter, secondary presenter etc. 
  • A generated list of various animals and their sources of food may be provided to reduce research times.

Additional Comments:
Sections on biodiversity and the sustainability of organism as well as recycling of matter may also be incorporated as points that student may be able to discuss.


© 2007, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 12

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: Wolastoqiyik: People of the Beautiful River

Lesson Description: Provide students with an understanding of the culture and lives of Wolastoqiyik. Students will gain an appreciation of First Nations traditional culture and way of life prior to European contact and how it changed post-contact.

Time required: 3 x 60 minutes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes: evaluate patterns for preserving, modifying, and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change  evaluate issues concerning the diversity and sustainability of Earth’s ecosystems  analyse the interactions within and between regions  evaluate how physical and human systems shape the features, uses, and perceptions of place  analyse the causes and consequences of human modification of the environment on systems within the environment ga Read More

Section One: Project/Lesson Overview

Grade: 12

Subject: Social Studies

Lesson Title: Wolastoqiyik: People of the Beautiful River

Lesson Description: Provide students with an understanding of the culture and lives of Wolastoqiyik. Students will gain an appreciation of First Nations traditional culture and way of life prior to European contact and how it changed post-contact.

Time required: 3 x 60 minutes

Specific Curriculum Outcomes:

  • evaluate patterns for preserving, modifying, and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change 
  • evaluate issues concerning the diversity and sustainability of Earth’s ecosystems 
  • analyse the interactions within and between regions 
  • evaluate how physical and human systems shape the features, uses, and perceptions of place 
  • analyse the causes and consequences of human modification of the environment on systems within the environment
  • gain a greater appreciation and understanding of Wolastoqiyik and their history, culture, and conditions

Section Two: Project/Lesson Implementation

Equipment/Materials Required: Access to Seasons of Change content

Lesson Procedures/Teaching Strategies:

Impart the following using resources indicated:

  1. The Wolastoqiyik are hunter/fisher/gatherer peoples that have survived in this region for centuries. Dr. Susan E. Blair, University of New Brunswick, conducted an analysis of various archaeological excavations and studies of ancient Wolastoqiyik history, and offers a glimpse of the life of our ancestors. 
  2. By examining the artifacts found at numerous areas around what is known today as the lower St. John River system, Blair identified a “record of habitation and domestic activity spanning more than 2000 years.” However, those dates are derived from specific sites used in her research; other sites offer artifacts dating as far back as 8000 years. Some of the artifacts found are arrowheads, flakes (bi-product from making arrowheads and other stone tools), as well as ceramics just to name a few. Radiocarbon dating is used on charcoal from fire pits or hearths found in sedimentary layers that were excavated. Have students examine the image, Wolastoqew Camp, Nerepis, and discuss the date, community structure and the location and natural environment evidenced in the image. 
  3. Another way Wolastoqiyik history survived is through the oral history, storytelling tradition of the culture. Have students read the story, Turtle Goes Hunting, and discuss the traditions and history recounted in the story. 
  4. The way Wolastoqiyik travelled changed based on seasonal climates and resources available. They also maintained communication with other groups of Wolastoqiyik, often setting up base camps and sending out groups to look for food or hunt for those left at the base camp. Wigwams were set up in areas that were close to the resources required. 
  5. When Wolastoqiyik were hunting animals or gathering anything from Mother Earth, they would thank her for giving her life for their survival and offer something back to her such as tobacco. Wolastoqiyik would also only hunt for what they needed. This tradition is still carried on today by many First Nations. In addition, every piece of the animal was used so that nothing was wasted. 
  6. Wolastoqiyik were very resourceful in the development of tools to help with their lifestyle. They made snowshoes and canoes completely out of items found in nature (birchbark, sinew). Wolastoqiyik canoes were considered the best made canoes in this area and differed from others of this region in that it had an extra piece of birch bark at the front of the canoe that made navigating through stronger currents easier. The canoes were also light enough to carry when certain distances needed to be travelled by foot (portage routes). This was the case of what is known as the Wolastoqiyik trails which begin in New Brunswick and ended in Passamaquoddy territory in Maine. This indicates how far Wolastoqiyik were able to travel using Wolastoq (Saint John River) and other water systems. 
  7. Even though great changes occurred from the time of European contact, it was not until the 1800s when reservations were set up by non-Aboriginals did the lifestyle of Wolastoqiyik begin to change dramatically. When reservations were set up Wolastoqiyik were also convinced that churches should be included in these new communities. Church leaders were often in control of a community’s money from land rental to sales of timber, discouraging the traditional movement of the people. 
  8. A further disruption to the traditional community and way of life came when a Residential School, built in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, took Wolastoqiyik and Mi’kmaq children alike away from their parents. Many years after the children had been sent to that school we heard of the abuse that children suffered at the hands of the nuns and priests at that school. 
  9. The families that were left on these new reserves now had to adapt to this new way of life. Always, resourceful families began to make baskets and other items to trade with European settlers. Making baskets was an art for First Nations; they made baskets for farmers as well as fancy baskets for art collectors. 
  10. Ronald Paul talks about the various activities that were done throughout the year from basket making to hunting. Items such as baskets were made and traded or sold to non-Aboriginals for use on farms. Other means Wolastoqiyik used to provide for their families were leading hunting expeditions for non-Aboriginals. Gabe Acquin of Sitansisk (St. Mary’s First Nation) was well known for his hunting expeditions. Have students examine the image of the Caribou Hunt, the image of turnips, bound for market and have them listen to Ronald Paul discuss the changing seasons. 
  11. For many years the Wolastoqiyik found a way to survive in an ever changing environment and their strength is still evident today. This is just a glimpse of the experience of the Wolastoqiyik that is documented. Who knows how much more information is hidden out there?

Assignment
Based upon the points above, content from the Seasons of Change Learning Object, and their own additional research, have students compose a 500 word essay that addresses the following questions:

How long have Wolastoqiyik inhabited the Wolastoq (Saint John River Systems) and how is this history determined?
- archaeological evidence
- oral history tradition

What was life like for Wolastoqiyik prior to European contact?
- respectful use of resources
- development of specialized tools and means of communication
- extensive use of river system and development of trail system
- specialized activities as seasons changed, ie hunting, location of communities

Name the disruptions to the traditional lifestyle of Wolastoqiyik and explain the results?
- European contact
- Reserve system
- role of the Church in the economy
- Residential Schools

Suggested Assessment Strategies:
Use standard performance-based assessment tools. Recommended criteria:

  • demonstrate and understanding of the patterns for preserving, modifying, and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change 
  • demonstrate and understanding of the issues concerning the diversity and sustainability of Earth’s ecosystems 
  • demonstrate and understanding of the interactions within and between regions 
  • demonstrate and understanding of how physical and human systems shape the features, uses, and perceptions of place 
  • demonstrate and understanding of the causes and consequences of human modification of the environment on systems within the environment

Section Three: Project/Lesson Resources

Supplementary Resources:
Blair, Susan E. The Ancient Wolastoq’kew Landscapes: Settlement and Technology in the Lower Saint John River Valley, Canada.

Johnson, Daniel F. The Tobique Reserve.

Web-Based Resources:
http://website.nbm-mnb.ca/Koluskap/index.php 

Disclaimer: The recommended web-resources included here have been scrutinized for their grade and age appropriateness; however, contents on links on the Internet change continuously. It is advisable that teachers preview all links before recommending them to students.


© 2007, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Seasons of Change Learning Object is designed for students and educators to meet the following objectives:

  • propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account human and environmental
    needs
  • explain various ways in which natural populations are kept in equilibrium, and relate this equilibrium to the resource limits of an ecosystem
  • analyse the impact of external factors on an ecosystem
    communicate questions, ideas, and intentions, and receive, interpret, understand, support, and respond to the ideas of others in preparing a report about ecosystem change
  • propose and defend a course of action on a multi-perspective social issue
  • investigate how artistic and literary expression reflects the following aspects of Canadian identity: landscape, climate, history, people-citizenship, and related challenges and opportunities
  • analyse the effects of selected geographic factors on Canadian identity: describe where Canadians live and explain why communities are established and grow in particular locations, account for the variations in growth of settlements due to physical and human factors
  • evaluate patterns for preserving, modifying, and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change
  • evaluate issues concerning the diversity and sustainability of Earth’s ecosystems
  • analyse the interactions within and between regions
    evaluate how physical and human systems shape the features, uses, and perceptions of place
  • analyse the causes and consequences of human modification of the environment on systems within the environment
  • apply concepts associated with time, continuity, and change
  • analyse and compare events of the past to the present in order to make informed, creative decisions about issues
  • examine the ideas of others in discussion and presentation to clarify and extend their own understanding
  • construct ideas about issues by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully to questions posed
  • present a personal viewpoint to a group of listeners, interpret their responses, and take others’ ideas into account when explaining their positions
  • recognize that communication involves an exchange of ideas (experiences, information, views) and an awareness of the connections between the speaker and the listener; use this awareness to adapt the message, language and delivery to the context
  • recognize that oral communication involves physical qualities and language choices, depending on the situation, audience, and purpose
    demonstrate an awareness of the power of spoken language by articulating how spoken language influences and manipulates, and reveals ideas, values, and attitudes
  • discuss the language, ideas, and other significant characteristics of a variety of texts and genres
  • demonstrate an awareness that texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions
  • distinguish between climate and weather
  • identify and explain the factors that control climate
  • explain regional variations in climate
  • demonstrate and understanding of underlying principles of climate classification
  • understand the relationship between earth, time and seasons

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