Otho Robichaud Scales

Otho Robichaud (1742-1824) was a merchant in Neguac. Appointed Justice of the Peace in 1794, he was one of the most influential Acadians of his time. Having been transported to Massachusetts during the Deportation of 1755, Otho Robichaud was educated in Boston, and returned to New Brunswick with the outbreak of the American Revolution twenty years later. At Neguac, he established a very successful lumbering and farming operation. These scales were used in his business during the early 19th century.

Musée acadien de l’Université de Moncton
Musée acadien de l’Université de Moncton
1742 - 1824
1969.67.456
© 2006, Musée acadien de l’Université de Moncton. All Rights Reserved.


Otho Robichaud   (1742-1824)

Otho Robichaud is one of the leaders of New Acadia.
Born in Annapolis Royal, formerly Port-Royal, Otho Robichaud and his family were deported to Massachusetts, and he received his education in Boston. When the American War of Independence was declared in 1775, Robichaud’s family moved to Quebec City. In 1781, Otho himself settled in Neguac and purchased a property there. Soon he took up farming and became involved in forestry. Over the years, he acquired several properties in the Miramichi region.

His persistence, education, and notoriety made him a remarkable figure in his community. In 1788, along with other community leaders, he called for the establishment of a court of law in Northumberland County. Justice of the peace in 1794, school trustee and road commissioner, and then captain of the militia, Otho Robichaud acted throughout his life as an intermediary between the government and the Acadians in the Miramichi region. His many government positions gained him the reputation of being a man of influence. Besides these numerous occupations, Otho Robichaud also managed the affairs of the Churc Read More

Otho Robichaud   (1742-1824)

Otho Robichaud is one of the leaders of New Acadia.
Born in Annapolis Royal, formerly Port-Royal, Otho Robichaud and his family were deported to Massachusetts, and he received his education in Boston. When the American War of Independence was declared in 1775, Robichaud’s family moved to Quebec City. In 1781, Otho himself settled in Neguac and purchased a property there. Soon he took up farming and became involved in forestry. Over the years, he acquired several properties in the Miramichi region.

His persistence, education, and notoriety made him a remarkable figure in his community. In 1788, along with other community leaders, he called for the establishment of a court of law in Northumberland County. Justice of the peace in 1794, school trustee and road commissioner, and then captain of the militia, Otho Robichaud acted throughout his life as an intermediary between the government and the Acadians in the Miramichi region. His many government positions gained him the reputation of being a man of influence. Besides these numerous occupations, Otho Robichaud also managed the affairs of the Church, both material and religious.


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Learning Objectives

The learner will understand that some Acadians prospered in a British dominated colony.

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