An entirely new and must-see attraction, this national museum presents Canada’s military past and how it shaped the country. Its outstanding exhibitions explain Canada s rich military history from earliest times to the present, featuring the experiences of people on the battlefields and at home.

The Museum’s dramatic architecture is a showcase for its vast art collection (some 13,000 pieces) and its extensive artifact collection, including military vehicles and artillery. The extensive permanent exhibition highlights key events and defining moments in Canada’s military history. Human conflict is explored through personal stories, art, artifacts, photographs and interactive presentations. The panoramic LeBreton Gallery houses a Voodoo jet, nineteenth-century artillery pieces, tanks and a wide range of vehicles.

Memorial Hall is designed for rest and reflection, and contains a single lone artifact: the headstone of the Unknown Soldier from the First World War which is directly illuminated by the sun each Remembrance Day, November 11, at 11 a.m.

With its spectacular location beside the Ottawa River and its stunning architectural d Read More
An entirely new and must-see attraction, this national museum presents Canada’s military past and how it shaped the country. Its outstanding exhibitions explain Canada s rich military history from earliest times to the present, featuring the experiences of people on the battlefields and at home.

The Museum’s dramatic architecture is a showcase for its vast art collection (some 13,000 pieces) and its extensive artifact collection, including military vehicles and artillery. The extensive permanent exhibition highlights key events and defining moments in Canada’s military history. Human conflict is explored through personal stories, art, artifacts, photographs and interactive presentations. The panoramic LeBreton Gallery houses a Voodoo jet, nineteenth-century artillery pieces, tanks and a wide range of vehicles.

Memorial Hall is designed for rest and reflection, and contains a single lone artifact: the headstone of the Unknown Soldier from the First World War which is directly illuminated by the sun each Remembrance Day, November 11, at 11 a.m.

With its spectacular location beside the Ottawa River and its stunning architectural design, innovative exhibitions and public programmes, the Canadian War Museum is a military history museum of international stature.

In this learning object, you will find two treasures from the Canadian War Museum.

© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.

This Loyalist uniform, a possession of the French family for 200 years, was donated to the Canadian War Museum in 1983. Dating back to 1781, it is one of the oldest complete military uniforms in Canada. It belonged to Lieutenant Jeremiah French of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. French had been a Loyalist, an American who stayed loyal to Great Britain during the American Revolution.
In 1777, French left his farm in New York and fled to Canada to serve with other Loyalists in the British army. South of the American border, he remained a traitor, hunted by rebel militia. “Wanted” notices offered thirty dollars, a large sum of money, for his return, dead or alive. When French joined the King’s Royal Regiment in 1781, he purchased this new uniform in Montreal. In Canada, Loyalists wore scarlet uniforms similar to those of British soldiers. The numerous golden buttons, arranged in pairs, bear the initials of the regiment: KRR. Together with the waistcoat and the epaulettes on each shoulder, such details indicate that French served in the regiment’s 2nd battalion. Made of scarlet wool with blue facings, lined with linen and finished with gilt a Read More
This Loyalist uniform, a possession of the French family for 200 years, was donated to the Canadian War Museum in 1983. Dating back to 1781, it is one of the oldest complete military uniforms in Canada. It belonged to Lieutenant Jeremiah French of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. French had been a Loyalist, an American who stayed loyal to Great Britain during the American Revolution.
In 1777, French left his farm in New York and fled to Canada to serve with other Loyalists in the British army. South of the American border, he remained a traitor, hunted by rebel militia. “Wanted” notices offered thirty dollars, a large sum of money, for his return, dead or alive. When French joined the King’s Royal Regiment in 1781, he purchased this new uniform in Montreal. In Canada, Loyalists wore scarlet uniforms similar to those of British soldiers. The numerous golden buttons, arranged in pairs, bear the initials of the regiment: KRR. Together with the waistcoat and the epaulettes on each shoulder, such details indicate that French served in the regiment’s 2nd battalion. Made of scarlet wool with blue facings, lined with linen and finished with gilt and gold buttons, this jacket, waistcoat and breeches offer a rare glimpse of eighteenth century military uniforms in Canada.

© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Royal Yorkers members during the 230th anniversary re-enactment of the Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777 in New York, 2007. (Photo : Gay Boggess of the Royal Yorkers)

Photo : Gay Boggess of Royal Yorkers
Canadian War Museum

© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.


The Canadian War Museum recently restored a rare German Panzer V (or Panther), one of the Second World War’s best tanks. Designed to combat highly effective Soviet tanks such as the T-34 and KV-1, the Panther had superior firepower, mobility, and frontal armor protection, but its complex drive and suspension systems left it vulnerable to mechanical failure. From 1943 to 1945, Germany produced 6,000 of the fearsome Panthers, which saw service on the eastern front, in Italy, and in northwest Europe.
This captured Panther was part of a Victory-in-Europe (or V-E) Day parade in Ottawa on May 8, 1945, and was later sent to Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, where it remained for 60 years. The military donated the tank to the Canadian War Museum in 2005 where, after a two-year, 4,000-hour, restoration project, it was placed on public display in January 2008.

The Canadian War Museum recently restored a rare German Panzer V (or Panther), one of the Second World War’s best tanks. Designed to combat highly effective Soviet tanks such as the T-34 and KV-1, the Panther had superior firepower, mobility, and frontal armor protection, but its complex drive and suspension systems left it vulnerable to mechanical failure. From 1943 to 1945, Germany produced 6,000 of the fearsome Panthers, which saw service on the eastern front, in Italy, and in northwest Europe.
This captured Panther was part of a Victory-in-Europe (or V-E) Day parade in Ottawa on May 8, 1945, and was later sent to Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, where it remained for 60 years. The military donated the tank to the Canadian War Museum in 2005 where, after a two-year, 4,000-hour, restoration project, it was placed on public display in January 2008.

© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Panther V Tank, 1942-1945, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, 15 Sept. 2009. (Photo : Rob Coles)

Photo : Rob Coles
Canadian War Museum

© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.


In every home, there are objects that we cherish or that have been passed from generation to generation. They are our family treasures. Just like museum artefacts, these objects play an important part in our family history.

With your students, take the time to explore family stories and traditions and to investigate the contributions they make to the rich and diverse Canadian society.

Canada’s Got Treasures is a dynamic web space that brings together objects found in museums and in people’s homes. It’s an interactive way to present your students’ family treasures to other Canadians. You can also learn more about the treasures submitted by Canadians and various museums.

First, have your students explore Canada’s treasures – objects, works of art, artefacts, documents, and important specimens from the country’s heritage institutions and national museums. Discover their history by reading the accompanying texts and looking at pictures inspired by each object.

Then, ask your students to question family members in order to find their own treasures. They can take a picture and bring you Read More

In every home, there are objects that we cherish or that have been passed from generation to generation. They are our family treasures. Just like museum artefacts, these objects play an important part in our family history.

With your students, take the time to explore family stories and traditions and to investigate the contributions they make to the rich and diverse Canadian society.

Canada’s Got Treasures is a dynamic web space that brings together objects found in museums and in people’s homes. It’s an interactive way to present your students’ family treasures to other Canadians. You can also learn more about the treasures submitted by Canadians and various museums.

First, have your students explore Canada’s treasures – objects, works of art, artefacts, documents, and important specimens from the country’s heritage institutions and national museums. Discover their history by reading the accompanying texts and looking at pictures inspired by each object.

Then, ask your students to question family members in order to find their own treasures. They can take a picture and bring you the file, or they can bring the object in class and let you photograph it. It is also recommended to create a small document describing the object and explaining what it means for the student’s family.

Note: You might have to send a note asking parents’ permission to post images of the treasures online.

Finally, upload these photos or videos (on YouTube or Flickr) and share your most precious or culturally significant treasures with the rest of Canada. Follow these instructions. http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/sgc-cms/expositions-exhibitions/tresors-treasures/?lang=en

* Please note that the interactive part of the project (YouTube and Flickr) will be re-evaluated in November 2011. It could be maintained (depending on participation rate) or not. If that component is removed, you will still be able to do the activity with your students – just create a blog or a wiki for your class and post the family treasures online. The parents will then be able to see the outcome of the project.


Have fun!


© 2010, Canadian War Museum. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

• learn more about treasures from Canadian museums;
• recognize the importance of family treasures;
• explain the significance of the objects selected by the institutions. 
 


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