The grizzly bear's range covers large portions of northwestern Canada and Alaska

The grizzly bear has a home range in which it travels throughout the year in search of both food and mates. Bear movement within the home range is further dictated by the annual cycle of vegetation. The grizzly bear has the greatest distribution of any species of bear because it occupies a wide variety of habitats. It is found in Alaska, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta and, in reduced numbers, in the northwestern United States.

Canadian Geographic

© 2010, Royal Canadian Geographical Society. All Rights Reserved.


A grizzly bear stares out from the British Columbia forest floor.

Scientific name: Ursus arctos horribilis Average weight: 250 kg–350 kg (male) 125 kg–175 kg (female) Average height: 1 m (on all fours) Average length: 1.8 m Average lifespan: 15-25 years The grizzly bear has a strong, heavy body. One of the grizzly’s characteristic features is the large shoulder hump that supports its massive front legs. This, along with its extremely long front claws and concave facial profile, helps distinguish it from the black bear.

iStockphoto/StephenSchwartz

© 2010, Royal Canadian Geographical Society. All Rights Reserved.


A freshly logged tree is surrounded by many stumps in a British Columbia forest.

A healthy wilderness needs a lot of elbow room — space that we continue to steal at an alarming rate. Forests are clear-cut for lumber and wetlands are drained for farmland, suburbs, or shopping malls. None of our actions are intended to make the original inhabitants more comfortable. From loss of old-growth forests in British Columbia to proposed pipelines in the North to dead lakes from acid rain in Ontario, threats and realities of habitat change are often thrust upon wildlife first.

iStockphoto/EmilyNorton

© 2010, Royal Canadian Geographical Society. All Rights Reserved.


A Grizzly End: A casualty of urbanization and clashing worldviews?

Lesson Overview:

This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to investigate the differences between two different cultures and their worldviews (for example: First Nations and European); focusing on the changes in people, economy, size, population and development.

(This lesson may easily be adapted for different worldviews/cultures.) What belief system did each culture have with regards to nature? What type of economic system was in place? What was the population? What natural resources did people rely on? How has society changed over the years? What similarities exist between a European belief system and the First Nations? What predictions can be made as to the further impact that urbanization will have on nature, in particular the grizzly bear?

Students will participate in a teacher-guided brainstorming session to complete a Venn diagram that illustrates the differences and similarities in culture and their worldviews. Students will develop an appreciation for Read More
A Grizzly End: A casualty of urbanization and clashing worldviews?

Lesson Overview:

This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to investigate the differences between two different cultures and their worldviews (for example: First Nations and European); focusing on the changes in people, economy, size, population and development.

(This lesson may easily be adapted for different worldviews/cultures.) What belief system did each culture have with regards to nature? What type of economic system was in place? What was the population? What natural resources did people rely on? How has society changed over the years? What similarities exist between a European belief system and the First Nations? What predictions can be made as to the further impact that urbanization will have on nature, in particular the grizzly bear?

Students will participate in a teacher-guided brainstorming session to complete a Venn diagram that illustrates the differences and similarities in culture and their worldviews. Students will develop an appreciation for different cultures and examine how different perspectives affect nature and its inhabitants over time with a particular focus on grizzly bears.


Grade Level:

Grade 7

Time Required:

Two classes required to allow for effective brainstorming and writing time.

Curriculum Connection for Alberta Social Studies Grade 7:

Alberta Social Studies Grade 7
7.1.2 appreciate the challenges of co-existence among peoples
7.2.3 appreciate the challenges that individuals and communities face when confronted with rapid change
7.2.7 assess, critically, the impact of urbanization and of technology on individual and collective identities in Canada by exploring and reflecting upon this question:
• What impact has increased urbanization had on rural communities in Canada?

Link to the Return of the Wild Virtual Exhibition: http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/wildlife-nature/

Additional Resources, Materials, and Equipment Required:

• Voices and Visions: A Story of Canada or Our Canada: Origins, Peoples, Perspectives (assigned textbook for Gr. 7 Social Studies)
• Venn diagram
• Large chart paper (optional)
• Markers (optional)

Additional Resources that may be used to guide students or to extend the lesson:

Canadian Atlas Online
www.canadiangeographic.ca/atlas/

CBC Online

http://www.cbc.ca/



Calgary Herald Online
http://www.calgaryherald.com

Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

Main Objective:

Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of how different worldviews/perspectives affect nature and its inhabitants (in particular the grizzly bear).

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:
• Explain the economic, social and cultural dimensions of two different co-existing cultures in the past.
• Explain the economic, social, and cultural dimensions of two different co-existing cultures now.
• Evaluate the information presented and come to conclusions that explain the differences and similarities between these two cultures.
• Use a variety of sources to draw connections between a culture’s worldview and its development.
• Using learned knowledge, make predictions about the future of nature and its inhabitants, in particular, the grizzly bear.

The Lesson

Teacher Activity/Student Activity

Introduction

Teacher introduces topic by providing and reviewing chapters in assigned textbook with students.

Students engage in reading of assigned chapters and respond to questions.

Lesson Development

Teacher directs class brainstorm then guides and prompts students with questions. Teacher instructs how to complete the Venn Diagram and jot a few points on the class Venn Diagram.

Students participate in class brainstorm and record answers on Venn Diagrams. Students review sources given them; then work in groups to complete Venn Diagram.

Conclusion

Teacher gives a summary of finished diagram, reviewing key concepts and subjects covered.

Students present their Venn Diagram.

Lesson Extension

This lesson may be extended by having students write a paragraph on the impact of urbanization on nature, in particular, the grizzly bear. There could also be a cross-curricular connection with Science (Interactions and Ecosystems) and the study of other species.

This lesson may be extended by examining more than two worldviews/perspectives of a particular group or culture. This lesson may be modified by adding different sources for the students to use to come to different conclusions, bringing in different literature and articles. It is possible to challenge the more academic students by having them draw more complex conclusions between worldviews as they have adapted or changed over time. These may include connections to economic activity, city planning, evolving populations and cultural values and beliefs


Assessment of Student Learning

Student diagrams may be evaluated using a rubric that outlines the criteria (relation to different cultures and perspectives, accurate data, etc.). Students may also complete a journal response explaining their understanding of how urbanization and economic development impacts us all. This will allow students to internalize the content in relation to themselves and their community.

The Six Essential Elements of Geography

1. The World in Spatial Terms: It would be interesting to see how the expansion and growth of cities have impacted nature and wildlife, in particular the grizzly bear.
2. Places and Regions: Urbanization has brought many changes to what used to be the natural habitat of the grizzly bear. Different cultural perspectives will have different approaches to conservation.
3. Physical Systems: The desire of cities to develop and urbanize has affected patterns of migration as well as the natural habitat of the grizzly bear.
4. Human Systems: As cities continue to grow and expand their boundaries, the natural habitat of the grizzly bear becomes smaller. The thrust for economic development raises concern for conservation.
5. Environment and Society: The expansion of cities and the growth of their population increase the risk of contact and confrontation between man and the grizzly bear.
6. The Uses of Geography: Different cultures’ perspectives on nature help balance the desire for urbanization and conservation.

The Five Sets of Geographic Skills:

1. Asking geographic questions: Students inquire into how the habitat of the grizzly bear has decreased over time as cities have continued to expand.
2. Acquiring geographic information: Students learn to assimilate geographic as well as historical information derived from various sources (books, thematic maps and online resources).
3. Organizing geographic information: Students organize and present information they have gathered by preparing a diagram or chart (in small groups or as part of a whole class discussion).
4. Analyzing geographic information: Students interpret and synthesize information they have researched (from statistical data, maps, charts, tables, articles and books) and make predictions on the plight of the grizzly bear.
5. Answering geographic questions: Students will formulate valid generalizations with regards to a particular cultural perspective and its impact on conservation.

© 2010, Royal Canadian Geographical Society. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

Students will participate in a teacher-guided brainstorming session to complete a Venn diagram that illustrates the differences and similarities in culture and their worldviews. Students will develop an appreciation for different cultures and examine how different perspectives affect nature and its inhabitants over time with a particular focus on grizzly bears.

Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of how different worldviews/perspectives affect nature and its inhabitants (in particular the grizzly bear).


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