This fabric is made from two strips of the same size and identical pattern sewn together by hand. The end is enclosed in a piece of bias binding and has a simple hem.

Knotting includes both simple and raised techniques and is also one of the oldest known weaving methods. The technique comes from the weaver's art. The decorative elements are knotted while the rest of the coverlet is a rag rug. The knotted designs are made by using a pin to pull the warp thread to form rolled loops or knots. These looped strands are normally wool while the foundation is frequently cotton. Designs are often crosses, stars, fir trees, arrows, squares and flowers but churches and animals may also be found. The most popular colours are purple, green and red although quite often a piece of fabric retains its natural fibre colour.

This fabric is made from two strips of the same size and identical pattern sewn together by hand. The end is enclosed in a piece of bias binding and has a simple hem.

Knotting includes both simple and raised techniques and is also one of the oldest known weaving methods. The technique comes from the weaver's art. The decorative elements are knotted while the rest of the coverlet is a rag rug. The knotted designs are made by using a pin to pull the warp thread to form rolled loops or knots. These looped strands are normally wool while the foundation is frequently cotton. Designs are often crosses, stars, fir trees, arrows, squares and flowers but churches and animals may also be found. The most popular colours are purple, green and red although quite often a piece of fabric retains its natural fibre colour.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Coverlet

Woven canvas with a knotted pattern

Linen with a "rising star" pattern

Handmade, late 19th century

Unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

Length: 229.1 cm, width: 201.5 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


This quilt is made in the blazing or "Lemoyne" star pattern. The quilt has a plain hem at the back. The quilting is in a diamond stitch pattern.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.
This quilt is made in the blazing or "Lemoyne" star pattern. The quilt has a plain hem at the back. The quilting is in a diamond stitch pattern.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Quilt

Handmade, late 19th century

Unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

vegetable dyes
Length: 192 cm; width: 165.2 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


This quilt was constructed on the wrong side from two strips of fabric. It was put together and embroidered in feather stitch. It was made from several scraps of different fabric.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.
This quilt was constructed on the wrong side from two strips of fabric. It was put together and embroidered in feather stitch. It was made from several scraps of different fabric.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Quilt

Handmade

unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection
20th Century
Length: 210 cm; width: 174 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


This kind of bedcover was very fashionable in Quebec towards the end of the 19th century. It is sewn by hand using a simple feather stitch on cream-coloured cotton. The crazy quilt category covers all non-geometric pieces, cut and pieced together. They could be appliquéd or not in an infinite variety of shapes and methods.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time (towards the 18th century), they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.
This kind of bedcover was very fashionable in Quebec towards the end of the 19th century. It is sewn by hand using a simple feather stitch on cream-coloured cotton. The crazy quilt category covers all non-geometric pieces, cut and pieced together. They could be appliquéd or not in an infinite variety of shapes and methods.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time (towards the 18th century), they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Quilt

Handmade, late 19th century

unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

Length: 189.4 cm; width: 153 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


Knotted coverlets are typical of the area around Charlevoix, more particularly, Ile aux Coudres. It comes from St-Irénée near Charlevoix and belonged to the Edmond Girard family.

This coverlet includes an integral pillow case. It is made from two strips of wool and serves a decorative function. The centre is embellished with a tree-of-life pattern surrounded by fir trees.

Knotting includes both simple and raised techniques and is also one of the oldest known weaving methods. The technique comes from the weaver’s art. The decorative elements are knotted while the rest of the coverlet is a rag rug. The knotted designs are made by using a pin to pull the warp thread to form rolled loops or knots. These looped strands are normally wool while the foundation is frequently cotton. Designs are often crosses, stars, fir trees, arrows, squares and flowers but churches and animals may also be found. The most popular colours are purple, green and red although quite often a piece of fabric retains its natural fibre colour.
Knotted coverlets are typical of the area around Charlevoix, more particularly, Ile aux Coudres. It comes from St-Irénée near Charlevoix and belonged to the Edmond Girard family.

This coverlet includes an integral pillow case. It is made from two strips of wool and serves a decorative function. The centre is embellished with a tree-of-life pattern surrounded by fir trees.

Knotting includes both simple and raised techniques and is also one of the oldest known weaving methods. The technique comes from the weaver’s art. The decorative elements are knotted while the rest of the coverlet is a rag rug. The knotted designs are made by using a pin to pull the warp thread to form rolled loops or knots. These looped strands are normally wool while the foundation is frequently cotton. Designs are often crosses, stars, fir trees, arrows, squares and flowers but churches and animals may also be found. The most popular colours are purple, green and red although quite often a piece of fabric retains its natural fibre colour.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Coverlet

Handmade, early 20th century

unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

Length: 236.2 cm; width: 164.5 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


This rag rug is made from cotton scraps and was used as a coverlet. It is unique in that it was made from a single strip. That shows it must have been made in the 20th century because earlier looms were not wide enough to weave a single strip. It has a pattern of large squares and is hemmed around the edges.

Their construction method is fairly simple, consisting of a band of natural fibre made by weaving thin strips of old cotton fabric together. Recycled fabric was often used. Today, rag rugs are no longer made at home but are part of the tourist economy.
This rag rug is made from cotton scraps and was used as a coverlet. It is unique in that it was made from a single strip. That shows it must have been made in the 20th century because earlier looms were not wide enough to weave a single strip. It has a pattern of large squares and is hemmed around the edges.

Their construction method is fairly simple, consisting of a band of natural fibre made by weaving thin strips of old cotton fabric together. Recycled fabric was often used. Today, rag rugs are no longer made at home but are part of the tourist economy.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Rag Rug

Handmade, 20th century

unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

Length: 198.1 cm; width: 142.4 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


The technique here is quilted appliqué. The decoration is in the "flame" (one of the oldest) and "snowball" patterns. It has been made in two strips and has a hem all the way around. The quilting is done in diamond stitch. This coverlet comes from Rigaud and belonged to the Quesnel family.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.
The technique here is quilted appliqué. The decoration is in the "flame" (one of the oldest) and "snowball" patterns. It has been made in two strips and has a hem all the way around. The quilting is done in diamond stitch. This coverlet comes from Rigaud and belonged to the Quesnel family.

In the early days of the colony, coverlets served a strictly functional purpose. In time, they took on a more decorative character. Quilting is a needlework craft. It was practised in almost every home towards the beginning of the 19th century. It required more painstaking work than rug making. Quilts were usually made from a cotton, jute or linen cover on which coloured pieces were sewn to create all kinds of decorative patterns. They could be patchwork (divided into rows of pieces), edged with a border or crazy quilts (fabric scraps sewn together in a random pattern). This construction is lined with batting and quilted.

© 1997, Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Coverlet

Handmade, late 19th century

unknown
Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection

Length: 222 cm; width: 172 cm
© Robert-Lionel-Séguin Collection


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Describe the history of rug making and quilting in Quebec culture
  • Explain the importance of these skills to Quebec culture
  • Relate materials, artistry, and technique of manufacture to form and function, using Quebec interior textiles as examples
  • Using examples, describe some of the patterns and colours utilized by the artists who created these rugs and quilts

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