“She beheld on his golden head his luxuriant hair steeped in ambrosia….On the winged god’s shoulders his dewy wings gleamed white with flashing brilliance… At the foot of the bed lay his bow, quiver, and arrows, the kindly weapons of that great god.”
(Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 5:22)

Cupid (or Amor) is the Latin name for Eros, Greek god of love. The myths of Eros give us a glimpse of the joys and sorrows of romantic relationships. He is cute and lovable, mischievous and dangerous. His arrows flow with love, but also pierce with pain. His realms are both divine and human. He is an angelic herald of love or a pest. He is winged, which speaks to the elevated and spiritual sides of love, yet it may be a flight of fancy, and there is a danger of falling. He is often a trickster playing with adult emotions.
“She beheld on his golden head his luxuriant hair steeped in ambrosia….On the winged god’s shoulders his dewy wings gleamed white with flashing brilliance… At the foot of the bed lay his bow, quiver, and arrows, the kindly weapons of that great god.”
(Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 5:22)

Cupid (or Amor) is the Latin name for Eros, Greek god of love. The myths of Eros give us a glimpse of the joys and sorrows of romantic relationships. He is cute and lovable, mischievous and dangerous. His arrows flow with love, but also pierce with pain. His realms are both divine and human. He is an angelic herald of love or a pest. He is winged, which speaks to the elevated and spiritual sides of love, yet it may be a flight of fancy, and there is a danger of falling. He is often a trickster playing with adult emotions.

© 2004, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Postcard Depicting Cupid Sitting on Heart

Cupid's name comes from the Latin “cupido” meaning desire. He is known for his bow and arrow, with which he shoots gods and mortals alike. A mischievous character, Cupid's shots are more often aimed to create a cruel kind of amusement for himself rather than to benefit his targets.

Photo Credit: Fanshawe Pioneer Village
1912
14 x 8.8 cm
x2002.91.18.
© Fanshawe Pioneer Village.


Notebook

Small pocketbook used for note taking. On the front cover the centre enamel shows Saint Joseph carrying the Baby Jesus; the four corners show a woman holding a cup, a man holding a torch, a Cupid bearing the inscription “Il faut te findre (sic) ” [“One must dissemble”] and a Virgin with Child. On the back cover the central enamel shows the crowned Virgin and a dragon, and the corner enamels show Saint John the Baptist, Saint Magdalene, Saint Joseph, and Saint Veronica.

Photo Credit: Ginette Clément.

Red silk, silver filigree, enamelled copper, red stones set in silver, silver strap-hinge clasps
9 x 6.5 x 2 cm
1994.290.
© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Explain how symbolism is used to represent romantic emotions in Valentine’s greetings
  • Describe the types of symbols traditionally used to represent feelings of love and affection

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