Station, Rivière-du-Loup

In a few years, several neighbourhoods grew up near the station. Workers, businessmen, industrial leaders, and hotel-keepers first established themselves along Lake Temiscouata Road, which led to the railway installations, and later, on the other bank of the Rivière du Loup. The first streets were laid out in these sectors in the 1880s.

Fonds Belle-Lavoie, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent, bl1006.
c. 1890
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


station, Grand Trunk, Rivière-du-Loup

The first station was built in 1860 in yellow brick from Scotland, above the big falls of the Rivière du Loup. This was the terminus of the Grand Trunk line arriving from Lévis. The village was mainly situated close to the St. Lawrence shore in those days, and few people lived in the area where the station was built. A locomotive repair shop, a structure to keep wood, a water tower, and a shed to store merchandise were the total installations at the time.

©Musée Mc Cord, William Notman, N-0000.193.53.2
1860
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Rue Saint-André, Rue Saint-Elzéar, Rue Fraserville, Rue Témiscouata, Rivière-du-Loup

With the opening of the Intercolonial Railway line, the station was too small; in 1883, increased activity justified the construction of a new building. Since the arrival of the railway twenty year earlier, farm and woodland had given way to stores, hotels, and houses. The first streets of this sector were laid out along the Rivière du Loup and on the slope that rose behind the station.

Société d’histoire et de généalogie de Rivière-du-Loup, Fonds Société d’histoire
1883
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Saint-François-Xavier neighbourhood near the station, Rivière-du-Loup

Railway activity had a major impact on the area surrounding the station, which was completely transformed within a few decades. A veritable rail and business hub, the city of Rivière-du-Loup grew tremendously at the end of the 19th century. From 1881 to 1891, its population doubled, far surpassing that of other communities in the region. Growth continued at such a pace that in 1905, two new parishes were founded in the town, one on each side of the river.

Fonds Paul-Émile Martin, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent, m04052
c. 1912
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives


• Understand the structural role of a new communication link.
• Realize the process of spatial transformation.
• Observe a phenomenon of urbanization and industrialization.


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