Extract of the census of Fraserville, Quebec, Canada, 1891

This extract of the census of the town of Fraserville contains information on the origins of the railway men, their place of birth, religion, and profession in 1891. The station and railway shops only hired men who had completed a recognized apprenticeship, and therefore, attracted skilled workers. Many of the mechanics, locomotive engineers, and brakemen who immigrated to the town were born in Ireland, England, Scotland, the Maritime Provinces, and the United States.

Library and Archives Canada, Temiscouata County, City of Fraserville, p. 110-111.
1891-05-12
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Archival document
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Extract of the census of Fraserville, Quebec, Canada, 1891

William McNeil was twenty years old. He was a locomotive fireman and was born in Quebec. Benjamin Walker was thirty five, and was station agent for the Intercolonial Railway. He was born in Quebec, his parents were born in England, and his wife, Marguerite, was of Irish extraction. All were Protestant. William Walsh was a locomotive engineer. He was thirty-seven and was born in Nova Scotia. He was Catholic, as were his wife and their four children, two of whom were born in the United States.

Library and Archives Canada, Fraserville, Temiscouata County, 1891, p. 111.
1891-05-12
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Archival document
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Scottish immigrant family, Rivière-du-Loup, 1904.

The jobs offered by the railway companies attracted immigrants of various origins. Many were of English or Scottish origin, and most were Protestant. They represented 8% of the population of Fraserville in the 1880s. If they wished to marry French-Canadians, Protestants were obliged to obtain a dispensation from the bishop of the diocese before the marriage could take place. This was a common situation in those days.

Fonds Stanislas Belle, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent, Frank King, b07655
1904-04-03
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

  • Observe a phenomenon of immigration.
  •  Compare the birth places, origins, and religions of the railway workers.
  • Understand the emergence of the skilled labour market and the notion of social mobility in connection with the development of the railway network.


Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans