Intercolonial Railway Map, 1876

The map shows the Intercolonial Railway line between Rivière-du-Loup and Halifax. This rail link was a political and economic issue for the new Dominion. Prime Minister John A. Macdonald promised to extend the railway to Halifax as a way of convincing the Maritime Provinces to join Confederation in 1867. The railway gave Canadians access to a vast market between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic ports.

Sandford Fleming
c. 1876
Atlantic Provinces, CANADA
Map
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Intercolonial Map 1876

Starting in 1860, Rivière-du-Loup was the eastern terminus of the Grand Trunk line. Between 1869 and 1876, the Intercolonial Railway built the Rivière-du-Loup-Halifax line. It ran behind the lands of villages on the St. Lawrence as far as Sainte-Flavie Station, then wound southeast through the Matapedia Valley, hugged the Baie-des-Chaleurs, and continued southwards through New Brunswick near the coast.

Fleming, Sandford. The Intercolonial. Montréal, Dawson Brothers Publishers. 1876. 268 pages.
1876
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec, CANADA
Map
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Intercolonial Railway map 1876

The trains of the Intercolonial Railway rounded the Baie-des-Chaleurs and continued down through New Brunswick to Moncton. After crossing Nova Scotia, they ended their journey at the port of Halifax.

Fleming, Sandford. The Intercolonial. Montréal, Dawson Brothers Publishers. 1876. 268 pages.
1876
Atlantic Provinces, CANADA
Map
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Sandford Fleming, chief engineer of the Intercolonial

From 1869 to 1876, the vast construction site of the railway is between Rivière-du-Loup and Halifax. Sandford Fleming, chief engineer, leads a team of surveyors and engineers who oversee the work. The distance is about 900 km.

Library and Archives Canada, C-001164
c. 1875
CANADA
Photograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Intercolonial Bridge Trois-Pistoles

On the railway line, teams of labourers built immense bridges of wood and iron, some of which presented daunting technological challenges. A good example is the railway bridge that crosses the entire 1000-foot breadth of the mouth of the Trois-Pistoles River, perched on five 100 foot-high pillars.

Sandford Fleming. The Intercolonial. Montréal, Dawson Brothers Publishers. 1876. P. 146.876. p.146
1876
Trois-Pistoles, Quebec, CANADA
Lithograph
© 2010, Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

• Understand the link between the construction of the railway and the formation of the Canadian federation.
• Realize the economic impact of the creation of a rail link between the Great Lakes region and Halifax.
• Be able to read a map.


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